COVID-19 Resources

PBAA partners with Communities in Schools of the Permian Basin

Look to these national real estate organizations for recommendations and best practices to guide your response to protecting your employees and residents while managing and operating your properties.

TAA has prepared sample rules properties may use when reopening amenities, to explain policies and procedures put in place as a result of efforts to minimize the spread of coronavirus. Remember, the TAA Lease allows properties to make reasonable changes in rules during the lease term, if they are distributed to all residents, apply consistently to all residents and do not change dollar amounts on page 1 or 2. The new sample rules are intended to be customized and incorporated into your existing policies.

Eviction Petition (with required statement regarding whether the property is covered by the CARES Act; for temporary use in Texas)

Guidance from NAA on the CARES Act (Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act.

CARES Act Most Common Questions (requires member login)

To help determine if your properties are covered under the CARES Act, check these searchable databases (Note: these do not include single-family properties, TAA is providing these as a resource but can not verify accuracy):

National Low Income Housing Coalition

National Housing Preservation Database

CARES Act Map This map was created by BASTA AustinTexas Housers, and Texas RioGrande Legal Aid)

Freddie Mac

Fannie Mae 

Available now: A sample Virus Warning and Waiver Addendum.This new form is a tool properties may use with residents signing a new lease. Residents are asked to acknowledge and assume risks associated with exposure to COVID-19 and other similar viruses and to release the property from liability related to those risks. This sample form is available now on the TAA website and TAA REDBOOK Online, and will be available to TAA Click & Lease users June 17.

NAA COVID-19 related policy concerns. (information page, links)

NAA members may email questions to cv19questions@naahq.org. These questions will help the association understand member issues and prepare guidance. Check NAA’s coronavirus resource page regularly for updates. NAA is expected to initiate weekly update calls soon.

TAA has also created a special email for members who have questions about handling COVID-19 issues in Texas: COVID-19@taa.org

Eviction Petition (with required statement regarding whether the property is covered by the CARES Act; for temporary use in Texas)

TAA has prepared sample rulesproperties may use when reopening amenities, to explain policies and procedures put in place as a result of efforts to minimize the spread of coronavirus. Remember, the TAA Lease allows properties to make reasonable changes in rules during the lease term, if they are distributed to all residents, apply consistently to all residents and do not change dollar amounts on page 1 or 2. The new sample rules are intended to be customized and incorporated into your existing policies.

Available now: A sample Virus Warning and Waiver Addendum.This new form is a tool properties may use with residents signing a new lease. Residents are asked to acknowledge and assume risks associated with exposure to COVID-19 and other similar viruses and to release the property from liability related to those risks. This sample form is available now on the TAA website and TAA REDBOOK Online, and will be available to TAA Click & Lease users June 17.

On May 5, Gov. Greg Abbott issued a new executive order (EO-GA-21) as part of the plan to reopen the state’s economy. While the order covers many areas, provisions regarding pools and gyms may be of particular interest to rental housing providers. Additional guidance on restrictions for these and other business operations can be found on the Open Texas website; also see checklists for different businesses and services and the Governor’s Report to Open Texas for more details. While these facilities may reopen in line with the Executive Order and guidance, it is still at the business owner’s discretion to decide whether or not to do so.

Gov. Greg Abbott announced his initial plans to reopen Texas businesses on April 27  as part of a phased-in approach; phase 1 began May 1. Social distancing measures are still required, which may limit capacity during the phase-in process. Expanded capacities planned for phase 2 are dependent on continued control of COVID-19 case incidence. Read the Governor’s Report to Open Texas.

See also Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick’s “Texans Back to Work Task Force Report.” (May 6, 2020)

Texas business owners are expected to be eligible for disaster injury loans from the Small Business Administration as a result of the COVID-19/coronavirus declaration of a state emergency. Apply now.

Small business programs at the governor’s office may also offer assistance. This page also includes links to federal resources.

Information and links from the National Federation of Independent Business for Texas small business owners.

Small Business Owner’s Guide to the CARES Act: Information from the U.S. Senate Committee on Small Business & Entrepreneurship on the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act

US Chamber Coronavirus Emergency Loans Small Business Guide and Checklist:The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act allocated $350 billion to help small businesses keep workers employed amid the pandemic and economic downturn. Known as the Paycheck Protection Program, the initiative provides 100% federally guaranteed loans to small businesses.

Importantly, these loans may be forgiven if borrowers maintain their payrolls during the crisis or restore their payrolls afterward.

The administration soon will release more details including the list of lenders offering loans under the program. In the meantime, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce has issued this guide to help small businesses and self-employed individuals prepare to file for a loan.

Paycheck protection program (for small businesses) FAQs:The Paycheck Protection Program, part of the new CARES stimulus package, is a federal loan program aimed at helping small businesses who have been severely impacted by COVID-19. The main objective of this loan is to help these businesses retain their workforce and assist with other operational expenses. (Information Courtesy of Live Oak Bank)

Coronavirus small business solutions:The Federal Government has dedicated over $350 billion in relief for small businesses, available through several loan programs. We have laid out each option so that you can carefully consider which loan makes the most sense for your business.

Eligibility for one may be impacted if you receive the other, but you can either choose the Paycheck Projection Program loan or the Economic Injury Disaster Loan.  (Information Courtesy of Live Oak Bank)

Department of Labor Information/Families First Coronavirus Response Act

The Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division recently released guidance regarding paid sick leave and expanded family and medical leave under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act.

The guidance addresses critical questions such as:

  • How does an employer count its number of employees to determine coverage?
  • How can small businesses obtain an exemption?
  • How does an employer count hours for part-time employees?
  • How does an employer calculate wages employees are entitled to under the FFCRA?

The initial WHD guidance is available in three-parts:

Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts

If you owe sales taxes:

The Texas Comptroller’s office is offering assistance in the form of short-term payment agreements and, in most instances, waivers of penalties and interest.

Contact the Comptroller’s Enforcement Hotline at 800-252-8880 to learn about your options for remaining in compliance and avoiding interest and late fees on taxes due.

See the agency’s COVID-19 emergency response webpage for access to online tools, tutorials and other resources for tax services, and to establish 24/7 online account access with Webfile.

The novel coronavirus is a new respiratory virus. Symptoms include fever, cough and shortness of breath and may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure. A vaccine is not available.

Prevention
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers these suggestions for basic protective measures:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Stay home when you are sick
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue away
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces

What to do if someone in your home tests positive for coronavirus or has COVID-19

What you need to know about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (English)

What you need to know about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (Spanish)

What you need to know about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) (Simplified Chinese)

What to do if you are sick (English)

What to do if you are sick (Spanish)

What to do if you are sick (Simplified Chinese)

Stop the spread of germs (CDC coronavirus one-pager)

What the public should do (CDC coronavirus one-pager)

Share Facts about COVID-19 (CDC coronavirus one-pager)

Workplace, school and home guidance (CDC coronavirus resource)

World Health Organization “mythbusters” (WHO page with downloadable graphics explaining coronavirus myths/facts)

Texas Department of State Health Services Communication Tools (multimedia, social media, printable)